Stanislav Sucharda

Foundation & museum

Stanislav Sucharda

 

The sculptor and medallist Stanislav Sucharda(1866–1916) came from a family with an artistic tradition stretching back to the second half of the 18th century. His father, the sculptor AntonínSucharda (1843–1911) ran the family business in NováPaka, which dealt in producing and restoring sculptures and church furnishings. The young Stanislav gained his first experience in his father’s workshop, in the operation of which all the family members played an active part. After spending two years studying ornamental drawing and modelling at the Czech Technical School, he went on to study sculpture for five years at the School of Decorative Arts in Prague under Josef Václav Myslbek, later becoming Myslbek’s assistant and eventually his successor. It was more than a symbolic success for the young graduate and his professor when Sucharda’s relief Lullaby was awarded the Reichel Prize in the Künstlerhaus in Vienna in 1892. Sucharda’s early work, influenced by Myslbek’s realism, lyricism, and ethnographic mood, underwent a major change after his encounter with the vigorous style of the French sculptor Auguste Rodin. Although Sucharda did not abandon his favoured repertoire (Slavonic mythology, and Czech history and fairy-tales), under Rodin’s influence his individual style became freer and the compositions of his drawings and sculptures became more dynamic. After 1905 Sucharda’s oeuvre also reflected Cubism, perhaps thanks to his close cooperation with the architect Jan Kotěra. Sucharda had a hand in the decoration of countless representative buildings; he was the first modern Czech sculptor to decorate them with monumental sculptures of glazed ceramic. Among his most important works we can mention his decoration of both wings of Prague Main Railway Station (1903-1904) and of the New Town Hall building (1910). In addition to the monument to FrantišekPalacký in Prague (1901–1912), Sucharda’s monumental work includes the monuments to Jan Amos Komenský (Comenius) in NováPaka (1912), the composer KarelBendl in Bubeneč (1914), and Jan Hus in Pečky and Železnice (designed in 1913–1915).Sucharda was also responsible for many sepulchres and portraits executed in various materials. Stanislav Sucharda was responsible for reviving Czech medal design. During his lifetime he created dozens of reliefs, medals, and plaques, including Spring (1904), Spinning Party (1906), and several jubilee and honorary plaques for the city of Prague (1909, 1910, 1912). Sucharda was awarded prizes for his artistry as a medallist at a number of international exhibitions (St. Louis 1904, Munich 1904, Brussels 1910,and Ghent 1913). In 1915 he was appointed Professor of the Department of Medal Design of the Academy of Fine Arts in Prague, a department which he played a key role in establishing, and where he transferred to after teaching for more than twenty years at the School of Decorative Arts. From the social and idealistic point of view Sucharda went down in the history of Czech art as a tireless initiator and organiser, above all during the many years he spent at the head of the Mánes Union of Fine Arts. The activities of this association were closely linked with the birth and dynamic development of Czech modern art in the early 20th century. Of major importance were both the exhibitions held by Mánes – especially the exhibitions of the work of Rodin (1902), Munch (1905), and Bourdelle (1909) – and also the intensive editorial activity of the association, beginning with the publication of the arts magazine Volné směry.

Sucharda fotografie od Drtikola
Sucharda v ateliéru
Antonín ml.a Karel Sucharda,Jan Machytka
Pamětní deska Stanislava Suchardy v Nové Pace